Something Happened 2001-2008

  • Something Happened:  This Noise Thing And Then I Lost Everything, 2002. Pencil. 9x11cm.  Coll.  Private. ©CARCC.

    Something Happened: This Noise Thing And Then I Lost Everything, 2002. Pencil. 9x11cm. Coll. Private. ©CARCC.

  • Something Happened:  The stone is removed, 2005.  Pencil and watercolour, 9x18cm. Coll. The Art Gallery  of Ontario. ©CARCC.

    Something Happened: The stone is removed, 2005. Pencil and watercolour, 9x18cm. Coll. The Art Gallery of Ontario. ©CARCC.

  • Something Happened:  The Roses Are Just Moving Into Fabulosity, 2005.  Pencil. 11x18cm. Coll:  Private. ©CARCC.

    Something Happened: The Roses Are Just Moving Into Fabulosity, 2005. Pencil. 11x18cm. Coll: Private. ©CARCC.

  • Something Happened:  Machines for reading the body, 2005. Pencil and watercolour.  11x27cm. Coll: The Art Gallery  of Ontario.

    Something Happened: Machines for reading the body, 2005. Pencil and watercolour. 11x27cm. Coll: The Art Gallery of Ontario.

  • Something Happened:  Upholstery on legs and arms, 2008.  Pencil. 9x11cm. Coll.  The Art Gallery of Ontario. ©CARCC.

    Something Happened: Upholstery on legs and arms, 2008. Pencil. 9x11cm. Coll. The Art Gallery of Ontario. ©CARCC.

  • Something Happened:  Tattoo #4, 2007.  Pencil. 11x9cm. Coll: The Art Gallery  of Ontario. ©CARCC.

    Something Happened: Tattoo #4, 2007. Pencil. 11x9cm. Coll: The Art Gallery of Ontario. ©CARCC.

  • Something Happened:  Tattoo #3, 2007. 11x9cm. Coll.  The Art Gallery of Ontario. ©CARCC.

    Something Happened: Tattoo #3, 2007. 11x9cm. Coll. The Art Gallery of Ontario. ©CARCC.

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“This is clearly a trained eye, undertaking a painful, “sometimes dreaded,” yet redeeming task. There is “a little story within each drawing,” each informing the larger “Something” of the collection’s title. The result is a profoundly moving visual account of loss, but one that allows us to imagine our own journey toward death and those we will leave behind.”

Allan Peterkin. “An Act of Remembering”, The Canadian Medical Association Journal (a special issue titled Lifeworks), Sept. 9, 2008, vol. 179(6).

“Life ends one way or another. This is one way. These drawings retrace an intimate and painful passing. They are a love letter to a beloved. There is a story – a long marriage, a year of pain and loss, and then a choice. Here drawing is an act of breaking down – an amalgam of looking, remembering and mourning. The years after she took Polaroids of her beloved Ewen, Jane Martin drew him into art history, into the history of living and dying and witnessing and sharing. Something happened – and we can all imagine the details. They are real and recorded and absolute.” Read a longer version →

Georgiana Uhlyarik. Associate Curator, Canadian Art, Art Gallery of Ontario